Termite Control


The subterranean termite is the most common and most widely distributed termite in North America. It is a problem for home owners from southern Ontario in Canada, south throughout the Eastern United States and as far west as Montana.

Termites feed on wood and serve an important function in nature by converting dead trees into organic matter. Unfortunately, termites don’t know the difference between dead trees and the wood in your home.

This native American pest feeds on such cellulose materials as structural wood, wood fixtures, paper, books, and cotton. Occasionally, it will even attack the roots of shrubs and trees.


Ants vs Termites Comparison


Quick Facts

  • Subterranean termites can enter buildings through cracks less than 1/16″ wide.
  • Colony growth is slow, and it may take years before swarmers are produced.
  • A mature colony of subterranean termites can range from a low of 20,000 to a high of 5 million workers, with an average of 300,000.
  • The colony’s queen will add 5,000 to 10,000 eggs per year to the total.
  • An average subterranean termite colony can consume 5 grams of wood per day, the equivalent of 2 1/3 linear feet of a 2’x4′ pine board annually.
  • The termite colony is made up of different types (castes) of termites – each with separate work responsibilities.
  • Although subterranean termite colonies are largely located in the ground below the frost line, secondary colonies can exist above ground, and examples of true above ground colonies existing without any ground contact have been seen. However, such above ground colonies have access to moisture and often the source is a roof or plumbing leak.
  • Subterranean termites will often build mud tubes for travel between their colonies and their food sources.
  • The king and queen in a colony can live for 10 to 30 years, while workers live for about two years.

Biology

termite mud tubeSubterranean termites are ground-inhabiting, social insects that live in colonies. A colony or nest of subterranean termites may be up to 18-20 feet below the soil surface to protect it from harsh weather conditions. Termites travel through mud tubes to reach food sources above the soil surface.

The mature termite colony has three castes:

  • Reproductives
  • Soldiers
  • Workers

The colony reaches its maximum size in approximately 4 to 5 years and may include 60,000 to 200,000 workers. New colonies are formed when winged males and females from a parent colony emerge in flight or swarm.

The winged reproductives (commonly called swarmers) are dark brown to brownish black and have two pairs of equal size wings that extend well beyond the body.

Swarms are common in spring and fall, especially after a rain. After a flight, the winged males and females return to the ground and shed their wings. The wingless males and females pair up and search for sources of wood and moisture in soil. The royal couple digs a chamber in the soil near wood, enters the chamber and seals the opening. After mating, the queen starts laying eggs.

The queen may live up to 25 years and lay more than 60,000 eggs in her lifetime. The eggs are yellowish white and hatch after an incubation of 50 to 60 days.

Full-grown workers are soft-bodied, wingless, blind and creamy white. In early stages, they are fed predigested food by the king and queen. Once workers are able to digest wood, they provide food for the entire colony.

The workers perform all the labor in the colony such as obtaining food, feeding other caste members and immatures, excavating wood, and constructing tunnels. Workers mature within a year and live from 3 to 5 years.

Soldiers are creamy white, soft-bodied, wingless and blind. The head of the soldier is enormously elongated, brownish, hard and equipped with two jaws. Soldiers must be fed by workers because they cannot feed themselves. They are less numerous in the colony than workers and their only function is to defend the colony against invaders. Soldiers mature within a year and live up to 5 years.

Feeding Habits

Subterranean termites feed exclusively on wood and wood products containing cellulose. Termites have protozoa (microorganisms) in their intestines that provide enzymes to digest cellulose. Although termites are soft-bodied insects, their hard, saw-toothed jaws work like shears and are able to bite off extremely small fragments of wood, a piece at a time.

Termites often infest buildings and damage lumber, wood panels, flooring, sheet rock, wallpaper, plastics, paper products and fabric made of plant fibers. The most serious damage is the loss of structural strength. Other costly losses include attacks on flooring, carpeting, artwork, books, clothing, furniture and valuable papers. Subterranean termites do not attack live trees.

An average subterranean termite colony can consume 5 grams of wood per day, the equivalent of 2 1/3 linear feet of a 2’x4′ pine board annually.


Signs of Termite Infestation

termite damageWood damaged by termites always has remains of mud tubes attached to wood galleries or tunnels in an irregular pattern. The tunnels may contain broken mud particles with fecal materials. In the case of an active colony, white termites may be found in infested wood.

The presence of flying winged males, females or their shed wings inside the building indicates an infestation.
termite damageThe presence of mud or shelter tubes extending from the ground to woodwork or on foundation walls also may indicate infestation. Workers travel periodically via shelter tubes to their nest to regain moisture and perform feeding duties. Each mud tube is approximately the diameter of a lead pencil.

How Old Is The Damage?

Based on normal feeding activity, it takes 3 to 8 years to cause appreciable damage. There have been some predictions that, under ideal conditions, a termite colony of 60,000 workers may consume a one-foot length of 2″ x 4″ pine in 118 to 157 days.

The presence of termite damage does not necessarily mean you have an active termite infestation. Look for signs of a previous treatment, such as drill holes in the concrete, or even a treatment sticker placed on the cabinet wall under your kitchen sink by a previous owner.


Treatment Methods

termite treatment

Liquid Chemical Barriers

Liquid Chemical Barriers work by killing or repelling subterranean termites before they enter the structure. The termites are killed before they enter the structure and/or killed upon leaving the structure to return to the colony.

When using a repellent chemical, the termites will stay away from the chemical because they have a sense for it and it repels them away from the treated area. If termites are in the structure and a repellent chemical is used, the termites will go up inside the walls and either remain there and attempt to organize a secondary colony or they will attempt to find a new way out of the structure. They are seldom successful and, in the absence of moisture, they are simply trapped inside the wall, cannot organize a new colony and eventually dehydrate and die.

This method of treatment is, for the most part, obsolete since the introduction and utilization of non-repellent termiticides over a decade ago.

Non-Repellent Liquid Treatment

Non-Repellent chemicals, the newest liquid barrier chemical treatments, are designed to be totally non-repellent to subterranean termites. This non-repellency factor is a great attribute in subterranean termite control. Fipronyl, registered as Termidor, is an example of a non-repellent chemical. The termites are not repelled and cannot even sense that this chemical is present.

Liquid treatments require annual inspections of the structure to ensure continued protection.

Termite Bait System

Advance Termite Bait SystemTermite bait systems are by far the most environmentally friendly method of treatment as there is no chance of liquid run-off.

A number of termite bait stations are installed around your home. These bait stations consist of a plastic housing, wood blocks at the bottom of the station, and a pestcide-free inspection cartridge (which contains nothing more than compressed cellulose).

There is no termiticide in these bait stations until, and unless termite activity is observed in or near the bait station. When termites are found, the inspection cartridge is replaced with a bait cartridge containing the active ingredient. Quarterly inspections and maintenance is required for this system to be effective.

Combination of Methods

In most cases, if you choose to have a Termite Bait System installed, and you also have an active termite infestation, we will perform a combination of liquid treatment and termite bait system. We will perform a spot or a partial liquid treatment directed at the source of infestation in addition to installing the termite monitoring system.

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